Steve G.

Posts Tagged ‘North Carolina’

Libertarian Mike Munger in historic WUNC-TV gubernatorial debate

In Libertarian, Libertarian Party-US, Local Politics, Media, Politics on September 25, 2008 at 7:20 pm

RALEIGH (Sept. 26) — For the first time in modern North Carolina history, a gubernatorial debate included a third party candidate. Libertarian Mike Munger appeared last night with Republican Pat McCrory on WUNC-TV.

The third candidate in the race, Democrat Beverly Perdue, declined to participate.

Munger thanked both WUNC-TV and McCrory for making this event possible. “A simple respect for the democratic process requires that all views to be heard,” he said. “The fact that we are both here tonight shows that neither one of us is afraid of making sure all views are presented to the public.

The debate was friendly, even when the candidates disagreed, and peppered with Munger’s usual quips.

Munger called the calls for off-shore drilling “a gimmick” that will only produce a “drop in the ocean of oil.”

He characterized as “economic prostitution” incentives used to lure businesses to North Carolina . “A business that comes to North Carolina for money will leave North Carolina for money,” he said.

In addressing construction of large, new buildings for schools and other public facilities, Munger said “I’m a political scientist; I know the technical term for this: BSOs – Big Shiny Objects.”

Both he and McCrory hit hard at the secrecy and corruption rampant in state government. “We have a play-to-pay system. We sell legislation and auction off public policy,” Munger said. He pledged to bring openness to government saying “Sunshine is the best disinfectant.”

When asked about the problems with the mental health system overhaul, Munger quipped, “It didn’t look like an overhaul to me. It looked more like a frat party. There was no unaccountability and no oversight.”

The use of the governor’s veto power is “like spanking your child: It means you’re a bad parent, that you haven’t successfully used all of the things that should come before that. Now maybe it sometimes still happens, but it really means it’s a failure for you, and it’s a failure for the child.”

Even though Perdue was absent, her name did come up during the debate, particularly during the discussion on education.

“Bev said she did not want to have all the same paradigms but she also said the governor is responsible for education,” Munger pointed out. “Why aren’t parents responsible for education?”

The sharpest difference between Munger and McCrory came on the issue of the death penalty. Munger said unequivocally he would commute the sentences of all prisoners on death row to life in prison without parole.

“I don’t think we have any business with the government killing our citizens,” he said. Munger believes the death penalty is administered unfairly. “Punishment shouldn’t depend on the color of your skin or how much money you have to pay a lawyer,” he said.

McCrory would immediately resume executions because “it was the people who said this person tragically deserves death as a result of the horrendous crime they committed …”

In closing, Munger addressed the myth that voting for a third party is a wasted vote. One vote does not decide an election, but it can send a signal, he said.

“Unless you have Jedi powers, you’re not going to be able to control the way other people vote,” he said. “You have one precious vote. Your decision on how to cast it will send a signal to our leaders in Raleigh.”

WUNC-TV will air a second gubernatorial debate Oct. 8. Perdue has also declined to participate in this event. Munger will participate in the final debate Oct. 15. It is sponsored WSOC-TV, WTVI CHARLOTTE and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg League of Women Voters. Perdue has accepted this invitation.

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LIBERTARIAN PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA
PO Box 28141 Raleigh NC 27611 * 877.843.5762 * http://www.LPNC.org

Brian Irving, Communications Director, 919.538.4548

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Press Release: Mike Munger responds to Public Forum Education Debate

In Libertarian, Libertarian Party-US, Local Politics, Media, People in the news, Politics, Press Release on September 19, 2008 at 3:32 pm

Libertarian responds to Public Forum Education Debate

RALEIGH (Sept. 19) — Mike Munger, Libertarian candidate for governor, responded to the Public Forum for North Carolina Education gubernatorial debate held today:

The Democratic and Republican candidates held another alleged debate today, sponsored by a supposedly non-partisan group, which excluded the third candidate in the race. Predictably, their answers focused on how they are going to fix the problem by using government power.

The event was ironically held under the banner: “Education: Everybody’s Business.” Everybody, that is, except those who challenge the status quo, including a professor with nearly 25 years as an educator. Compounding the irony was the fact this “public” forum was held on private property and attendance was by invitation only. The program was recorded by the NC Telecommunications Association, another supposedly non-partisan group, and will be aired by WUNC on cable systems across the state.

News14 Carolina aired the debate live, but to their credit they interviewed me afterward. I hope that the follow-up interview will be distributed along with the main debate.

Public Forum for North Carolina Education President John Dornan opened the event by saying this was the third time his group has sponsored this event. He failed to mention, of course, that it is also the third time they have excluded the Libertarian Party candidate.

Also conspicuously absent was any apparent involvement of parents. Dornan mentioned the teachers, education administrators, government officials and business leaders were among the 400 people attending, but did not say anything about parents.

Lt. Governor Perdue said there shouldn’t be only one paradigm for education. Mayor McCrory claimed he wanted to change the “culture of education.” Yet both talked only about one paradigm and one culture — that of having bureaucrats in Raleigh choose the curriculum, restrict the selection of teachers, and dictate the process of licensing.

The truth is that nothing will change if either of these folks are elected. Perdue believes the “responsibility of education rests with the governor,” a statement that shows her contempt for the parents and teachers of our state.

McCrory said he’d put more business leaders on the state Board of Education. Take away the political sloganeering, and both are telling the insulated and hidebound education establishment: “Vote for me, and I will give you other people’s money.”

My platform calls for a real paradigm shift, and a truly new culture. I believe the responsibility for each child’s education rests with two groups: the parents of that child, and the highly motivated teachers that the parent chooses. And I’ll let you keep more of your own money, money you yourself have earned. I would offer each parent in the state an education voucher, financed by lottery proceeds, of $1,250 per child in their household. This voucher could only be spent at a state-accredited school, or be credited to the household in the case of home-schooling.

And by the way, vouchers don’t “cost” anything, as Perdue claims, because it’s your money, not the government’s. If anything, vouchers would save money in the long run, as the average costs of education would fall.

Competition and school choice will be the central premise of the Munger Administration’s education policy, to give parents more control over their children’s education. I would streamline and simpilfy the accreditation process, lift the cap on charter schools, and foster the growth of charter schools, religious or theme schools, or any other kind of innovative educational program that can attract the children of parents who want to exercise their choices as parents.

I know charter schools work because my son attends Raleigh Charter High School, ranked as one of the top ten high schools in the nation. The cost per student is just over half that of the average for NC high schools. Facilities costs are less, administrative costs are less, and janitorial services are either provided by the students (they take out their own trash), or by contracting out to private firms that clean the bathrooms and mop the floors.

Last, but not least, I would put a floor on public school spending at its existing level, for a five year adjustment period. Our schools need basic infrastructure work, from physical plant improvements to textbooks. So those of you worried about my voucher program should rest assured: the money will come from the payments already owed to education, by statute, but taken by the General Assembly for pet projects. No program cannot work by starving the traditional public schools of revenue. And I don’t want the General Assembly to be tempted to cut education dollars and use them for pork barrel spending in their districts, hoping lottery money will make up the difference.

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LIBERTARIAN PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA
PO Box 28141 Raleigh NC 27611 * 877.843.5762 * www.LPNC.org
Brian Irving, Communications Director, 919.538.4548

Barbara Howe
Campaign Manager, Munger for Governor
http://www.munger08.com
919-690-1423 (h)
919-475-2371 (c)

Press Release: The Liberty Agenda

In Activism, Libertarian, Libertarian Party-US, Media, Politics, Press Release on September 15, 2008 at 11:34 am

The following is a news release from Brian Irving, Communications Director for the Libertarian Party of North Carolina.

Libertarian Candidates Propose Liberty Agenda

RALEIGH (Sept. 15) — Ending the state’s power to seize private property by forced annexation and eminent domain, improving public education through competition, restoring free, fair and open elections, and cutting off corporate welfare, will be the top legislative priorities of a Libertarians elected to the General Assembly.

Thirteen candidates announced the Liberty Agenda for North Carolina today. They are: Kira Howe (Senate 7), Brian Irving (Senate 17), David Rollins (Senate 20), Richard Evey (Senate 44), Jesse Mignogna (House 2), Sean Haugh (House 30), Barbara Howe (House 32), Susan Hogarth (House 38), Robert Richmond (House 71), T.J. Rohr (House 87), Jeffrey Ober (House 95), Lawrence Hollar (House 96), and Keith Calvelli (House 108).

“I originally ran for council because my property was involuntarily annexed and have vigorously opposed any future involuntary annexations,” said second-term Lenior City Council member Rohr.

“After the U.S. Supreme Court incorrectly allowed the practice of eminent domain for purely economic development purposes, I proposed a city resolution condemning that decision and calling for an amendment to the NC Constitution abolishing such practices,” he said. “The resolution passed unanimously.”

Improving public education is as much a priority for the legislative candidates, as it is for Mike Munger, Libertarian candidate for governor.

“There are many good things happening in North Carolina education,” Munger says on his website. “And the path to continued improvement is to foster choice.”

“We expect Governor Munger will get strong opposition from the education lobby and teacher’s unions,” said Irving. “So he’ll need all the allies in the General Assembly he can muster.”

Irving agrees with Munger that it’s fashionable to bash public education, rather than sincerely seek ways to improve it. “The problem is that anyone who proposes thinking out of the box when it comes to education is beat over the head with the supposed public school mandate in the state constitution,” he said.

“This selective devotion to constitutional principle is curious, since the legislature freely ignores other parts of the constitution, including the part that says ‘all elections shall be free, fair, and open’ by restricting the right of people to vote for anyone other than Democrats and Republicans,” said Irving.

The Liberty Agenda candidates also oppose economic incentives to businesses, more properly called corporate welfare, as an immoral tax on individuals for the benefit of corporate profits. Recent news reports that the Dell computer company may sell their three-year old Winston-Salem plant, built with nearly $300 million in corporate welfare, demonstrate corporate incentives are ineffective as well as immoral, said Irving.

As proof that Libertarians will do what the say when elected, Rohr said, “I was the only local elected representative to vote against the infamous Lenoir-Google government handouts.”

“Ending property theft by government, improving education, restoring fair elections, and cutting off corporate welfare — these are just our top four issues” said Hogarth. “We will then go on to work to reduce the size, scope and power of government at all levels and on all issues, and
will consistently oppose increasing the size, scope and power of government at any level, for any purpose.”

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The Liberty Agenda for North Carolina

Here is the text of the Liberty Agenda

We, Libertarian candidates for North Carolina General Assembly, pledge that our priority while in office will be to put Freedom First for all the state’s citizens. This Agenda fully supports the campaign agenda of Mike Munger, Libertarian candidate for Governor of North Carolina.

1. Ending forced annexation and stopping private property seizure under the power of eminent domain by amending the state constitution.

Forced annexation and the seizure of private property for ostensible “public purpose” is a violation of the fundamental rights of all Americans. Forced annexation is not about providing services, or controlling growth. Forced annexation is about money. Communities should only be annexed with their consent. No government, at any level, should have the power to take or seize private property for any purpose, without the express consent of the owner and without just compensation..

2. Improving public education through school choice and competition.

We agree with Mike Munger, Libertarian candidate for governor, that it has become fashionable to bash public education rather than sincerely seek ways to improve it. There are many good things happening in North Carolina education, and the path to continued improvement is to foster choice.

The problem is that anyone who proposes thinking out of the box when it comes to education is beat over the head with the supposed public school mandate in the state constitution.

This selective devotion to constitutional principle is curious, since the legislature freely ignores other parts of the constitution, including the part that says ‘all elections shall be free, fair, and open’ by restricting the right of people to vote for anyone other than Democrats and Republicans.

3. Restoring free, fair and open elections to North Carolina by removing barriers to ballot access.

North Carolina has arguably the most restrictive ballot access laws in the nation. These barriers are specifically designed by the Democratic-Republican duopoly to restrict the people’s freedom of choice, prevent independent and third party candidates from getting on the ballot. Elections laws also are used to restrict free speech, by limiting how much an individual can contribute to the candidate of their choice. The people should have the unregulated and unrestricted right vote for and support candidates of their choice.

4. Cutting off all corporate welfare and subsidies.

Economic incentives and subsidies, more properly called corporate welfare, are an immoral tax on individuals for the benefit of corporate profits. Recent news reports that the Dell computer company may sell their three year old Winston-Salem plant, built with nearly $300 million in corporate welfare, demonstrate that corporate incentives are ineffective as well as immoral.

Conclusion

Ending property theft by government, improving education, restoring fair elections, and cutting off corporate welfare only the beginning of the Liberty Agenda. Our goal and our pledge is to reduce the size, scope and power of government at all levels and on all issues, and consistently oppose any increase in the size, scope and power of government at any level, for any purpose.

/signed/

Kira Howe, Senate 7

Brian Irving, Senate 17

David Rollins, Senate 20

Richard Evey, Senate 44

Jesse Mignogna, House 2

Sean Haugh, House 30

Barbara Howe, House 32

Susan Hogarth, House 38

Robert Richmond, House 71

T.J. Rohr, House 87

Jeffrey Ober, House 95

Lawrence Hollar, House 96

Keith Calvelli, House 108
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LIBERTARIAN PARTY OF NORTH CAROLINA
PO Box 28141 Raleigh NC 27611 * 877.843.5762 * http://www.LPNC.org
Brian Irving, Communications Director, 910.987.5844

LP/Green ballot access lawsuit in NC goes to trial

In Activism, Big Brother, Courts and Justice System, Democrats, Green Party, Law, Libertarian, Libertarian Party-US, Local Politics, Media, Politics, Republican on May 6, 2008 at 3:25 am
By JOEDY McCREARY
Associated Press Writer
Monday, May. 5, 2008 6:44 pm

RALEIGH (AP)- A Libertarian candidate for governor testified Monday that state law makes it “effectively impossible” to conduct a grassroots campaign in North Carolina.

Mike Munger, a Duke University professor, testified during a civil trial that could determine whether state laws are too stringent and unfairly limit the ability of third parties to get on the ballot.

The Libertarian and Green parties filed a lawsuit that claims state laws that define a political party are onerous and violate party members’ rights to free speech and association. The law also affects how party candidates can be included on ballots.

State attorneys defend the law, saying legislators approved rules that maintain the integrity of elections by requiring a political party to demonstrate it has adequate support from voters.

Under the law, a party must collect nearly 70,000 voter signatures to receive official party status. Party leaders said that’s one of the highest thresholds in the country. If the party’s candidate doesn’t get 2 percent of the vote for president or governor, the party must start over. The requirement had been 10 percent until the rules were changed in 2006.

The Libertarian Party has surpassed the signature requirement for all but one presidential election since 1976, state attorneys argued in court filings. The Green Party has never met the petition standard.

Special Deputy Attorney General Karen Long cross-examined Munger, who acknowledged only four Libertarian candidates have been chosen for the state House, which has 120 seats, and three Libertarians ran for Senate, which has 50 seats, for this year’s election. The party would be able to offer more candidates if it qualifies for the ballot by this year’s petition deadline.

Munger also admitted that since 1992, Libertarian candidates had enough signatures to get on the ballot but did not win any state elections. A party spokesman said later Monday the party has won nonpartisan elections.

But the lawsuit, filed in September 2005, said the Libertarian Party has paid more than $100,000 to hire solicitors to collect signatures along with volunteers for a successful petition. The process and money drain favors the state Republican and Democratic parties.

The signature deadline for this year’s general election is June 2.

Controversial overdose rescue kit saves lives

In Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Health, Personal Responsibility on January 26, 2008 at 8:52 pm

Opiate effect on brainRichard Knox, NPR “All Things Considered” 02 January 08:

Every year, overdoses of heroin and opiates, such as Oxycontin, kill more drug users than AIDS, hepatitis or homicide.

And the number of overdoses has gone up dramatically over the past decade.

But now, public health workers from New York to Los Angeles, North Carolina to New Mexico, are preventing thousands of deaths by giving $9.50 rescue kits to drug users. The kits turn drug users into first responders by giving them the tools to save a life.

One of the new rescue operations is located off a side street behind St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Cambridge, Mass. Clients enter through an innocuous-looking door and climb a flight of wooden stairs to the Cambridge Cares About AIDS program for harm reduction.

The group says its mission is to provide prevention, education, advocacy and support services to the economically and socially disadvantaged.

At CCAA, drug users can obtain condoms, sterile needles, syringes and other resources to reduce their vulnerability to disease and death. Health educators also cajole their clients to undergo HIV and hepatitis testing, urge them not to share needles, and find them slots in detoxification programs and methadone treatment.

Drug Used as a Nasal Spray

On one recent wintry morning, health educator Eliza Wheeler teaches a 34-year-old client named Elissa how to rescue her friends from a fatal overdose.

“All right, Elissa,” Wheeler says in a getting-down-to-business manner. “The first thing I’m going to do is ask a series of questions about your current drug use. So, we’re going to talk about just the last 30 days.”

Elissa has been on methadone for six years, but she confesses that she used heroin a couple of days in the previous month because she was under a lot of stress.

Like most long-term heroin users, Elissa has had scary experiences with overdoses – her own and others’. Once, her partner became unresponsive after taking a mixture of heroin, benzodiazepine pills and alcohol, she says.

“He was not breathing, which is why I called the ambulance,” she says. “But I managed to wake him up before they came, and they didn’t take him away. He went out and convinced them he was OK.”

Many times, drug users and their friends don’t call 911, which is why overdoses are so often fatal. They’re afraid the police might come, and they could get arrested — or lose their housing or custody of their children.

Signs of Overdose

Wheeler runs through the signs of heroin overdose for Elissa.

“There are some clear signs, like people turning blue,” Wheeler says. “Sometimes, there’s like a gurgling sound and nonresponsiveness, of course. And there are some less clear signs, like people being in kind of a heavy nod — kind of being really sedated — not breathing very often. We usually say 12 breaths a minute is key. So, if people are breathing less than that, it’s time to really be concerned.”

Wheeler says stimulation — rubbing hard on the breastbone or the upper lip — can sometimes bring an overdose victim back to consciousness. If that doesn’t work, call 911 and start blowing air into the person’s lungs, a modified form of CPR called “rescue breathing.”

That’s when it’s time to open up the overdose rescue kit, Wheeler says, ripping open a plastic bag and taking out a small box containing a vial of medicine.

“This is what the box looks like,” she says. “Attached to the box is a little apparatus that makes it into a spray. It’s just a nasal spray. There’s no injection.”

“That’s so wonderful!” Elissa says, looking visibly relieved. “I had thought it was a shot.”

The nasal spray is a drug called naloxone, or Narcan. It blocks the brain receptors that heroin activates, instantly reversing an overdose.

Doctors and emergency medical technicians have used Narcan for years in hospitals and ambulances. But it doesn’t require much training because it’s impossible to overdose on Narcan.

The Cambridge program began putting Narcan kits into drug users’ hands in August. Since then, the kits have been used to reverse seven overdoses.

New data compiled for NPR by researcher Alex Kral of the consulting firm RTI International show that more than 2,600 overdoses have been reversed in 16 programs operating across the nation.

Kral estimates that is at least 75 percent of all the reversals that have occurred so far among several dozen U.S. programs, many of which are new.

John Gatto, executive director of the Cambridge program, says such dramatic results are unusual in the world of substance abuse treatment and prevention.

“In the work that we do, oftentimes the results are very intangible,” Gatto says. “This is amazing to be involved in something that literally can save people’s lives. Why wouldn’t we do it?”

Program Has Critics

But Dr. Bertha Madras, deputy director of the White House Office on National Drug Control Policy, opposes the use of Narcan in overdose-rescue programs.

“First of all, I don’t agree with giving an opioid antidote to non-medical professionals. That’s No. 1,” she says. “I just don’t think that’s good public health policy.”

Madras says drug users aren’t likely to be competent to deal with an overdose emergency. More importantly, she says, Narcan kits may actually encourage drug abusers to keep using heroin because they know overdosing isn’t as likely.

Madras says the rescue programs might take away the drug user’s motivation to get into detoxification and drug treatment.

“Sometimes having an overdose, being in an emergency room, having that contact with a health care professional is enough to make a person snap into the reality of the situation and snap into having someone give them services,” Madras says.

Study Confirms Benefits

There is not much research on the effect of Narcan kits on drug abusers’ behavior, but one small study suggests that overdose-rescue programs reduce heroin use and get some people into treatment.

Karen Seal, an author of the study, says the study showed rescue programs have a tremendous impact.

“It was one of those great studies where we just all walked away and said, ‘Whoa! This is terrific!’” says Seal, of the University of California, San Francisco. “I mean, by our sheer interaction with these folks around these life-saving behaviors, we’re actually creating some real positive change here.”

And health educator Wheeler says putting overdose-rescue kits in the hands of drug users sends them a positive message.

“There is a real potential culture change among drug users because of Narcan,” she says. “Because, from my experience, I feel like drug users internalize a lot of stigma that’s out in the world about them. They come to believe that dying is just part of this life that they’ve chosen.”

Wheeler says it doesn’t have to be that way.

Despite the rescue program’s critics, it has not generated the kind of controversy that surrounded needle-exchange programs. Those programs seek to prevent drug users from getting HIV or hepatitis by sharing dirty needles and syringes.

So far, Narcan rescue programs have sprung up in big cities and rural areas around the country with little or no opposition.

Marginalizing murder

In Children, Corruption, Courts and Justice System, Crime, Health, Law, Law Enforcement, Military, Obituaries, People in the news, US Government on January 11, 2008 at 11:41 pm

Maria LauterbachI have been watching the news reports about the young, extremely pregnant female Marine, Lance Cpl. Maria Lauterbach, who disappeared almost a month ago.

What has been most prominent in this case is the systematic marginalization of a young woman who dared to accuse a man, a superior officer, of sexual assault. I expected that out of the Marine Corps. I did not expect that from her family and civilian authorities.

When she disappeared in December, the military did not report her missing, although certainly they were aware of it. Her stepmother was the person who filed the missing persons report. It now seems that her stepmother had advised her in a telephone conversation, shortly before her disappearance, to put her baby up for adoption because she couldn’t care for it. However, I’ve yet to see a Marine who can’t handle diaper duty. I suspect her stepmother really suggested adoption because of the identity of the father.

Apparently she had filed a rape charge against a superior officer, and a hearing was upcoming. The minute she filed a rape charge against a fellow Marine, she placed herself in danger, and the Marine Corps wasn’t about to do a thing to protect her.

As every female in the military is well aware (I used to be in the Air Force, many years ago) “don’t ask, don’t tell” applies to far more than sexual orientation. It also applies to females speaking out against the good ol’ boy system which is our military. They don’t want women there, and they especially don’t want mothers there. The latter is understandable to an extent, for many reasons; the former is not.

If a female is sexually assaulted by a fellow solder, and she reports that assault, she is assumed to be lying. Most females in the military will not report a crime committed by a male counterpart, and especially a superior officer, because they know how it will be viewed. The female, by filing such a charge, has bought their ticket out of the military, and with that goes all the benefits of being in the military, as well as the income. They will be forced out as a disgraced soldier.

Sure enough, it has been announced that she was facing involuntary discharge.

It has been said that she is suicidal and a chronic liar by her own family, by military authorities, and by the Onslow County Sheriff’s Department. Just yesterday, the Onslow County Sheriff made a plea for the missing woman to come back and face her problems.

Today, the Onslow County Sheriff announced that she is dead. Not only is she dead, she’s buried. It’s kind of hard to bury yourself when you’re dead. Obviously, she did not commit suicide. She was murdered. Obviously, the number one suspect is the superior officer.

Yet the Sheriff just said he is not terming this murder, because there are “a lot of twists and turns”. However, when you’re dealing with the military and they are covering something up, there are always going to be twists and turns. Sheriff Brown needs to get smart, and realize that he was being sent in other directions intentionally, to divert attention away from the Marine Corps.

Now, authorities are saying that the superior officer she accused is also missing. Apparently he’s been missing for a week, and was supposed to appear for duty at Fort Carson, Nevada.

Given the rape allegation, one would think he would have been noticed missing long before now. Undoubtedly the Marine Corps was aware that he had disappeared, and one would think they’d have made that information available. Had they done that, it would have been clear very early in the investigation that she had most likely been a victim of foul play, and the case would have been investigated as a possible murder rather than as a missing person. There is a huge difference between those two types of investigation, after all, since every adult has the right to disappear if they so desire.

But no. All this time, everyone – the Marine Corps, the Onslow County Sheriff’s Department, and even her own family – have worked on the assumption that she was lying about being raped by a superior officer. All this time, they have been protecting a murderer, a man who killed not only a fellow soldier, but an expectant mother and, quite obviously, her unborn child which could have survived outside the womb since she was eight months pregnant when she disappeared. As far as I’m concerned, that’s murder number two.

Today officials are saying that she was murdered because her unborn child would have been proof of her accusation of rape, which is undoubtedly a very big motive for murder on the part of the superior officer. So why wasn’t the Marine Corps ensuring this young woman’s safety from her attacker? Why didn’t they share that information with civilian authorities who were investigating her disappearance?

There are a lot of questions in this case which will probably never be answered. After all, the military is a law unto itself, and they don’t have to cooperate with local authorities.

However, this wouldn’t be the first time a Marine committed cold-blooded murder. The most famous case is undoubtedly that of Captain Jeffrey McDonald, who in the 70s murdered his pregnant wife and his two very young daughters, then tried to claim that drug-crazed hippies had committed the crime. It took decades to convict him of that heinous crime, due to the incompetence of the Marine Corps.

It looks like the Marines haven’t learn a thing since then. It’s all about protecting the reputation of the Corps. Semper Fi and all that, you know.

Originally posted by ElfNinosMom on Adventures in Frickintardistan