Steve G.

Posts Tagged ‘DOMA’

Barr on DOMA 12 years later

In Civil Liberties, Congress, Constitutional Rights, Law, Libertarian, Libertarian Convention, Libertarian Party-US, Libertarian Politics, Personal Responsibility, Politics, US Government on January 5, 2009 at 2:57 pm

From the Los Angeles Times, 1-5-09:

No defending the Defense of Marriage Act

The author of the federal Defense of Marriage Act now thinks it’s time for his law to get the boot — but for political reasons, not in support of gays.
By Bob Barr
January 5, 2009
» Discuss Article
In 1996, as a freshman member of the House of Representatives, I wrote the Defense of Marriage Act, better known by its shorthand acronym, DOMA, than its legal title. The law has been a flash-point for those arguing for or against same-sex marriage ever since President Clinton signed it into law. Even President-elect Barack Obama has grappled with its language, meaning and impact.I can sympathize with the incoming commander in chief. And, after long and careful consideration, I have come to agree with him that the law should be repealed.

The left now decries DOMA as the barrier to federal recognition and benefits for married gay couples. At the other end of the political spectrum, however, DOMA has been lambasted for subverting the political momentum for a U.S. constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage. In truth, the language of the legislation — like that of most federal laws — was a compromise.

DOMA was indeed designed to thwart the then-nascent move in a few state courts and legislatures to afford partial or full recognition to same-sex couples. The Hawaii court case Baehr vs. Lewin, still active while DOMA was being considered by Congress in mid-1996, provided the immediate impetus.

The Hawaii court was clearly leaning toward legalizing same-sex marriages. So the first part of DOMA was crafted to prevent the U.S. Constitution’s “full faith and credit” clause — which normally would require State B to recognize any lawful marriage performed in State A — from being used to extend one state’s recognition of same-sex marriage to other states whose citizens chose not to recognize such a union.

Contrary to the wishes of a number of my Republican colleagues, I crafted the legislation so it wasn’t a hammer the federal government could use to force states to recognize only unions between a man and a woman. Congress deliberately chose not to establish a single, nationwide definition of marriage.

However, we did incorporate into DOMA’s second part a definition of marriage that comported with the historic — and, at the time, widely accepted — view of the institution as being between a man and a woman only. But this definition was to be used solely to interpret provisions of federal law related to spouses.

The first part of DOMA, then, is a partial bow to principles of federalism, protecting the power of each state to determine its definition of marriage. The second part sets a legal definition of marriage only for purposes of federal law, but not for the states. That was the theory.

I’ve wrestled with this issue for the last several years and come to the conclusion that DOMA is not working out as planned. In testifying before Congress against a federal marriage amendment, and more recently while making my case to skeptical Libertarians as to why I was worthy of their support as their party’s presidential nominee, I have concluded that DOMA is neither meeting the principles of federalism it was supposed to, nor is its impact limited to federal law.

In effect, DOMA’s language reflects one-way federalism: It protects only those states that don’t want to accept a same-sex marriage granted by another state. Moreover, the heterosexual definition of marriage for purposes of federal laws — including, immigration, Social Security survivor rights and veteran’s benefits — has become a de facto club used to limit, if not thwart, the ability of a state to choose to recognize same-sex unions.

Even more so now than in 1996, I believe we need to reduce federal power over the lives of the citizenry and over the prerogatives of the states. It truly is time to get the federal government out of the marriage business. In law and policy, such decisions should be left to the people themselves.

In 2006, when then-Sen. Obama voted against the Federal Marriage Amendment, he said, “Decisions about marriage should be left to the states.” He was right then; and as I have come to realize, he is right now in concluding that DOMA has to go. If one truly believes in federalism and the primacy of state government over the federal, DOMA is simply incompatible with those notions.

Bob Barr represented the 7th District of Georgia in the House of Representatives from 1995 to 2003 and was the Libertarian Party’s 2008 nominee for president.

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Jim Casarjian-Perry: Bob Barr hits home

In Congress, Law, Libertarian, Libertarian Party-US, Libertarian Politics, Politics, Social Security Administration, US Government on May 9, 2008 at 10:36 am

The following is posted with the permission of the author, Jim Casarjian-Perry. The original article can be viewed here.

Bob Barr hits home. Why would you do that to me Bob?

Before long, people are going to think I have a vendetta against Bob Barr. I don’t really have one against him, just his past votes. Like his support (and authorship!) of the Defense of Marriage Act. This lovely piece of federal law prevents the federal government and it’s related bureaucratic agencies from recognizing same-sex marriages. There is a problem here… it’s effects are being felt in MY MARRIAGE. One such instance occurred today.

I’ve dragged my feet about getting my driver’s license switched from NH to MA. I went to get this done today. You need to have four documents with you in order to transfer your license. 1) Birth Certificate, 2) Social Security card, 3) Proof of Massachusetts residency (like a lease), and 4) your old license of course. I have all these things with my pre-marital name on them except for my lease. Here is where the fun starts.

I took all these required documents AND my official state marriage certificate (which verifies my name change due to marriage) to the Registry of Motor Vehicles. They looked them over and said they couldn’t process my application. The reason? My Social Security Card does not reflect my name change. Okay, so off to the SS (heh) office.

The SS office requires your birth certificate, proof of name change and ID to change your name on your card. I had all of these documents. The clerk and I chatted for a few minutes, she congratulated me on getting married, she showed my pictures of her kids, etc as we waited for the system to process my request. No dice. The Social Security Administration informed me that due to the DOMA (which Bob Barr authored) I could not use my Massachusetts Marriage Certificate as proof of name change. Next steps still need to be determined as to how I am going to get my identification documents changed. But until then I ask, why would you do that to me Bob?

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Jim Casarjian-Perry is a Town Meeting Representative serving Precinct 9 of Billerica, Massachusetts. He is a Libertarian Party member and a delegate to the Libertarian National Convention for Massachusetts. He enjoys cooking, reading, bicycling, backpacking, and good conversation. He and his partner live in Billerica, Massachusetts.

Many thanks to Jim for allowing us to reproduce his original work on Last Free Voice. 🙂

Will Barr Announce At The Heartland Conference?

In Libertarian, Libertarian Party-US, Libertarian Politics, Media, People in the news, Politics on April 1, 2008 at 4:55 pm

Bob BarrFrom Fox News:

Barr told FOX News on Tuesday that he should know in the next few days whether he is going to go for it.

If he does decide to make an announcement in the next few days, Barr said it “would not be in either Washington or Atlanta.

Another source told FOX News that the announcement should happen this weekend, probably on April 5. That is the day Barr is scheduled to be the keynote speaker at the Heartland Libertarian Conference in Kansas City, Mo.

Click here to read full article

I wonder if Mr. Barr will end his Republican PAC and call for the repeal of DOMA if he is the Libertarian Party’s Presidential nominee. Of course, when he announces (if he announces) these questions will almost certainly be asked by his 14+ Libertarian opponents.